Help please! Need tips...

by Abbi
(Oregon)

I'm in horse 4-h. My leader leased me an ugly biting,kicking, rearing bucking horse that's in NOT an easy keeper and I'm just a novice.

I need tips on the following:


  • grooming supplies, and where to get it;

  • mane and tail untangling;

  • teaching horsey manners, and;

  • how to build a relationship with my horse.



Thanks guys!

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Dec 01, 2014
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all pretty
by: Alyssa the horse gentler

Okay all horses are pretty! On grooming a curry comb, stiff brush and a soft brush I get my stuff from valley vet and ranch stores.
For main and tail just use a curry comb
Horses do not need manners
And for relationship okay their is like a million things for that so I will give you 7
1.Blow into his/her nose if she blows back you are friends and always will be!
2.Spend time with him/her every day
3.groom every day or as much as possible
4.Study the way your horse acts and find out what it means
5.Be nice and never mean around him/her never lose your control
6.Find his/her fave spots to be brushed and brush them [ you will know he/she likes it if he/she sways sort of
7.Ride bare back do not be scared he/she can sense it be happy and ready for a ride let him/her sense that

Jul 31, 2012
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Hope this helps!!!
by: HorseRider

Well for starters try doing join up which is where you lunge a horse in a round pen and make the horse go which way you want, what speed you want and u need to show the horse who's boss!!! Also try to show him as much love as u can and also do join up as much as u feel needed and in join up. be sure to have a fierce posture until the horse shows u that he/she wants to join u and be ur friend. when that happens show a nice posture and see if the horse follows u!!! Also u should be able to find grooming supplies at a tack shop or online!!! You may also find some good information on what to do on the internet or online!!! Hope this helps!!!

Jul 16, 2012
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the horse
by: Anonymous

here's one first pray to God. Find some books stay around your horse a few months to get her to trust you then start advancing like let her get used to the saddle blanket. when she's used to that try the saddle then when she's used to that try the bridle. make sure you have grown up with you so you won't get trampled or if you get hurt they can get help.

Jul 14, 2012
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The horse
by: Anonymous

Congrats on the horse :)

Grooming- Well that can contain Curry comb, Hard brush, Soft brush, Hoof pick, Hair Brush and comb. it shouldn't matter what brand you buy as long as they don't break right away. You can get Grooming Supplies almost anywhere that sells horse related stuff.

Mane and tail untangling- Well it will help if you brush the mane and tail everyday so it doesn't tangle as fast. That's what i do with my horse.

Teaching horsey Manners- Well let's start with if he goes to bite sternly tell him 'NO' and show him he is not the boss but you are. don't let him get away with stuff, He sounds like he's above youre level but if your consistent about not letting him get away but maybe flicking his nose when he goes to bite and sternly talking to him, he should learn pretty fast to use his manners around you.

How to build a relationship- We'll i found that joining up is really fun and helps so does lunging and T-Touch. But the more time you spend around him the more you bond, Talk to him. Groom him, Lay on his back, kiss him, Attempt to teach him tricks, Pet him, and just lead him around the barn explaining things to him. He will learn to respect you if you respect him. SHow him your not a threat and understand him. The more time you spend the greater the bond. I was terrified i would never bond with my horse at first but now he loves me more then i love him it seems like.

Other- Well Remember to always wear your helmet and with a horse like him use firm hands well riding he sounds like he'll try to get away with whatever you let him. Try to be as nice as you can when you ask but don't be afraid to be rough if needed. i'm not sure what breed he is or how tall but big horses are the hardest to handle and so are Thoroughbreds. Also Young horses are hard to handle as well, I'm sure you'r 4-h teacher would never give you a horse she didn't think you could handle. Try to be as safe as you can with him but also have fun. Good luck!

Jul 12, 2012
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OK
by: Katie

Ok the grooming supplies you need: curry comb, dandy/body brush (tougher), facial brush, mane-pulling comb, scissors, clippers, hoof pick, sweat scraper, back ups of supplies, and mane comb/brush. Most tack stores should have these supplies.

I use a special stuff that I ordered off of Dover Saddlery called Canter Mane and Tail detangler. It works like a charm! Spray it on, wait a couple minutes, and brush through. Voila! You've got a soft and supple mane and tail. I used this on my mare's tail which had most likely never brushed before and it got every tangle out to where I could run my fingers through.

Ok basically you need to teach him that you are the dominant one. He will always boss you around unless you take care of that. I have experience from learning the hard way with my mare. Under saddle if he tries to rear, make him move. Buck, take out the hindquarters. Also do those when on the ground with him if he tries that while you are walking with him. HORSEMANSHIP AND GROUNDWORK IS YOUR BEST FRIEND! (sorry for the caps) In order to get my mare to really listen to me, I used a lot of horsemanship techniques. I still have to because it really does take a lot of time and patience. If he tries to bite, then you need to use the fatty part of your hand and tap him on his jaw. I know people say that it's bad to do that to a horse, but that was the only way I got my mare to stop 1. invading my space and 2. stop biting or even nipping. It taught her that she has to wait patiently as well for snacks and food.

Also to build a relationship, horsemanship and spending time with the horse. It takes patience and time but it is really worth it in the end.

Jul 12, 2012
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some help (:hopefully
by: englishridingcwgrl

Hey. I think the best way I can help you is by giving you a web address. This is where I get most of my info stuff: http://www.youngrider.com/resources.aspx

I hope there is things there that can help you.

Jul 12, 2012
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Hi Abbi
by: Unicorn

Sorry to hear your horse is being a pain! I'm no expert, just an apprentice, but I'll try to suggest some answers to your questions:
1. You can get grooming supplies at tack shops. Failing that, feed shops and farming stores almost always have something.
2. Elbow grease and daily brushing is all that I've ever done to keep manes and tails tangle-free. Be careful not to pull the hairs out by accident, because you'll end up with a scruffy mane and a sore and grouchy horse. Intentionally pulling the mane to tidy it is a different story. Mane combs have never worked for me; use a real hairbrush designed for people, a good solid one, which won't pull and will de-tangle. Be careful, though. If your horse is bratty, he might kick when you brush his tail or bite when you comb his mane. Always stand to one side while brushing the tail.
3. I teach the horses manners the same way as a lead mare would teach her herd manners; using pressure and release, and discipline. If he bites you, reprimand him, not for vengeance or really as punishment but to let him know he's doing the wrong thing. A firm (but not loud) "Horse, no!" and a bump with your elbow against his neck or shoulder, or a smack with the flat of the hand, should suffice. Don't hit him to hurt him; it's more a gesture than anything else. You can also carry a short riding crop if it makes you feel more comfortable. Don't hit him on sensitive areas like the face or legs. It will only make him nervous.
When he's good, give him reward or release. Say you're trying to touch his face and he keeps trying to bite you. Discipline when he bites. When he doesn't, take your hand away and praise him with your voice.
Often, ill-mannered horses just need someone who is calmly firm, but never rough. Always remember to reward or release when they give you what you want. Horses need a leader and if you're not going to put him in his place he's going to try and put you in it. A smack for him today can prevent a broken bone for you tomorrow.
4. One word: time. Spend time with him. Disciplining him won't make him hate you; he'll respect you for being his "lead mare". Grooming is excellent; it simulates the nibble-grooming horses do in the herd. Talk to him often; he doesn't speak English, but he'll learn to love your voice. Do anything, really; just be with him, watch him, get to know him. You'll be amazed at how closely he will get to know you.

With a "mean" horse, it's always smart to wear a helmet - it's not a great fashion statement but it's a life saver. A helmet is not a guarantee but it is a wonderful help. Use a long lead rein so that he doesn't pull you underneath him when he rears.
And if he's really no match for you, try to find a different horse. Fighting with him and getting yourselves hurt isn't worth it. A good professional will be able to help you no end, and remember, take what I say with a pinch of salt - I'm just a longwinded amateur.
Stay safe, have fun and good luck!

Unicorn

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Getting a New Horse! Need Advice!

by Brianne
(USA)

I'm getting a new horse because my first pony, Candy Man is 12.3 hh. Now I'm 4'11 I have sadly outgrown and have sold Candy Man!

My parents are letting me get a new horse, since I have a lot of exp and knowledge with horses, now have been riding for 7 years I am thinking about getting a young horse. But still looking for an old for more confidence.

I am a jumper I jump, 3'0 but I love Dressage, Cross Country too! I have found some horses now I just need to choose one:

*- Maid In Manhattan aka Aurora .

6 year old pretty "A" circuit been there done that flashy young mare. Trained to event, has won many ribbons. Chestnut with 4 white socks easy to bath clip load vet etc.. No vices 15.3 Hanoverian. Spooks on trails, hasn't done much X-country very brave and easy going. Quite a buddy.

*- Jetz aka Kool Your Jetz.

16.3 hh Black & White Pinto Saddle bred Stallion, 4 year old. Put in training as 3 months. X Race horse. Being used as hunters or flat riding at the moment. Barefoot, no vices,light on his feet, acts like a exp horse. Loves attention and to be riding. Not so much a steady Eddie needs a confident rider.

*- Silver
•2004, 16.2hh Dapple Grey Warmblood Mare
•This stunning mare is beautiful and talented. Currently jumping 2’9 to 3’6. With loads of potential to make the 1.20 (4ft) and higher. Would make a great jumper. Very careful. She will win! If you are looking for a horse to take you into the higher rings, she is a mare that you don’t want to miss.

*- Connect The Dots

Fancy "AA" 14.3 1/2 2001 Grey Welsh Pony Mare, lots of exp in hunter/ jumper ring. Training in dressage, mounted games and cross country. Many wins shows up to 3'0. Auto changes, no vices easy to haul/ trail/ loud/ vet. Easy going can be riding by anyone. No spook. Safe and Honest, good ride. Don't miss! Daughter has given up riding reason for selling.

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Jan 14, 2013
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hope this helps
by: Anonymous

DAPPLE GREY WARM BLOOD MARE!!!!!! she sounds gorgeous! personally i LOVE dapple grey mares that's what i would get but hey, it's your choice
i hope you get her . :)

Jul 24, 2012
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really late
by: Anonymous

but i would get silver..

Apr 11, 2012
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Probly kinda sorta late;)
by: Horseluver4evernever

Well the is really late but I would get silver cause he is what suits your needs!

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I Need Tips!

by Jordyn
(CA)

Me (there was a costume contest earlier that day and I had a seven year old paint him as a zebra big mistake)

Me (there was a costume contest earlier that day and I had a seven year old paint him as a zebra big mistake)

I have a little 12 hand welsh mix who hates jumping although I Ride western I do gymkhanas. You might not know about them but essentially you run around poles and barrels in little events to get the best time and win well there is jumping event Hurry Scurry where you jump three little white 18' jumps.

Every time my pony jumps he stalls a little bit them he jumps three feet over the jumps and its really annoying I try to do the two-point position but it made my horn hit my ribs and bruise me.

Please help and give me some tips.

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Dec 01, 2012
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to jordyn and her jumping troubles
by: caylee

have you tried just walking your pony over and then going faster through out the week or month. i'm having the same troubles with my new paint mix and also try to get an english saddle used on ebay.

p.s: i hope this helps you <3

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Help! I Need advice!

by Maria
(MD)

Okay, so this isn't a story but I just turned 14 and we're going to move and I can get a pony.I know lots about horses and I'm considering training a yearling. I haven't ridden much but when I do people say I have a natural seat. Should I do it? I love challenges... please help!

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Jan 14, 2013
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yearling hands down
by: Anonymous

i would get a yearling, it's like any animal. the younger you start to train it the better bond you will have with the horse.

Aug 24, 2012
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Both!
by: Anonymous

I would say get a yearling and a HORSE, not a pony. When you train a horse from birth you form a bond, whereas when you just buy a already trained horse you don't have that bond and then that horse just doesn't respond to you as well (trust me, I know!)
Good luck. :)

Jun 06, 2012
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Umm...
by: Eventing Star

Ok, I would if I were you NOT get a yearling. I am training 5 yearlings and 2 4 months and they are a lot for me now and I have rode for 10 years and trained for 3 (since I was nine) They need someone with experience or it can ruin their life. You need to be confident in everything around horses. You need to know how they learn and work. Like say one of the 4 moths kicks just to kick. You can just be grooming when she will kick you. And one of the yearlings charges me every time I go in the pasture...we are working om this. My advice: Get a been there done that then after a few years of riding consistently then think about getting a yearling. One of my friends got a foal because it was cute. DON'T FALL IN THEIR TRAP OF CUTENESS!!! Then she had to give it to me to retain because she messed her up and spoiled her rotten. this is the horse that charges. It would've been easier to train her right from the start then breaking her bad habits. Oh, and if you are 14 you would want a full horse. Instead of a pony. I did this and the saddest day is when I out grew them! And I am only 12!

Jan 03, 2012
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Ok
by: Sienna

It depends how confident you are. If you think you can do it then go ahead!! But if not then wait a bit more until you are a bit more confident.

Dec 30, 2011
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helping out.
by: Anonymous

Buying a horse is a huge responsibility, congrats on it though! But I do agree with buying a horse or even a quarter pony but buying a yearling is hard and difficult if you do not know what your doing, you could ruin the horses ability, I would suggest getting someone with experience to help you and preferably you would need to let the horse sit for two years until fully developed. I am a trainer, I have trained numerous horses, but for the fact that I have ridden my whole life it's hard to make that decision when you have a younger horse. they are hard to handle and have extremely short attention stands. I would suggest talking with your instructor/trainer and ask them what they think, I would suggest a calmer horse around 5 or 6 years old with lots of life left but are more broke and forgiving.

Dec 27, 2011
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Older horses
by: Anonymous

Always start out by buying a "Been there done that" type of horse.

Always start out with buying an older horse.

I would get a horse 15 yrs or older.

I don't own a horse, but I study on one thing about a horse for one hour a day, write it down, and do lots of other stuff! But the best person to learn from is Cherry Hill.

My favorite horse books by her is:

Horse Health Care-- Cherry Hill
Stable keeping-- Cherry Hill
Cherry Hill's horsekeeping Almanac.

You will learn a lot about buying a horse and health care and everything else by her.

But, good luck on getting a horse!

I wish I could have one!

Keep in mind that you are VERY lucky to get a horse.

Again, Good luck.

Oct 03, 2011
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Opt to Train!
by: Anonymous

Hey! You should totally go for a yearling. But I would get a horse, not a pony. Since you're already 14, you would outgrow a pony very soon. If you will have nice facilities and your family knows a lot about horses, training a yearling could be a great experience.

I trained a 16-month old Rocky Mountain at 12, and I'm still alive! When you train a horse, you become so much closer to them. You become his mama, and that's a beautiful thing. I'm not saying that this wouldn't be hard though. Different breeds come with different temperaments and dispositions.

If a quarter horse was on your shopping list, I would definitely make sure that your mom, dad, or trainer could be around to help you. Rocky Mountains have incredible disposition, but I was still thrown about 9 times. With hard work and patience though, not taking the easy way out and buying a trained horse can really pay off!

Please consider training a yearling!

P.S. Read my story, "Three Wishes" on this page for some inspiration. Good luck!

Jul 25, 2011
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Depends
by: Soizic

Well, when I was 10, I didn't know a lot about horses. I fell in love with a 4 month old Arabian colt and started researching all about horses. My parents bought him for me.

I learned while he did, and i got to grow up with him and know how he acted and build a bond. I got to train him and be the first one on his back, and it really is the best feeling in the world to finally sit on your baby for the first time :)

So it all depends if you have patience or not, good luck whatever you choose!!!

Jun 20, 2011
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yearling?
by: Anonymous

If I were you I wouldn't get a yearling. From the sounds of it you're not totally ready. You could get a yearling eventually, but first I would suggest an older horse. Around maybe 13-16 years old. Then you have a sort of been there done that horse that could train you and help you work on your riding skills and horsemanship. Once that has happened you can challenge yourself with a cute yearling! :)

Jun 10, 2011
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Also.
by: Tangolove

Don't get a yearling! Get a good 10-15 year old who is experienced. :D

May 23, 2011
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In my opinion
by: Delaney

For your safety I would wait and ride maybe a year or two to get to understand how to control the horse if you know what I mean.

My BFF has ridden five years and she just got her first horse and they had to send him of to be broken and when the got him back a month or so later he was an angel but after a couple of weeks at her home he started to pick up bad habits. He would stop and just let her sit there and kick him all day and kick out.

She would get very frustrated ( my riding instructor said to be careful when frustrated bc you can also become unintentionally aggressive) They may have to be sending him back to have him trained again because we're afraid she will get hurt on him because he is also very pushy when he is scared (which is a lot).

This is just my opinion and i don't want you to get hurt. Something you could do tho if you do decide to get this horse is have someone who you trust and the horse trusts who has experience training young horses work with him and you while your riding him and she/he can help a lot. Also Please Don't Ride Alone! :) Hope this helps with your decision :)

May 21, 2011
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Thanks again
by: Maria

Thanks again for all your help. tangolove my pony loves watermelon! I would post a pic but I don't know how lol. I'm not very electronicy lol.

May 20, 2011
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Thanks again
by: Maria

Thanks to tangolove for all the tips. As for posting a pic I would lol but I don't know how! :) If you guys want to talk more my howrse.com username is irie19707. I look forward to talking with you

May 14, 2011
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Tangolove (aka Amy)
by: Anonymous

Great! Have a wonderful time with your new pony! Here are some tips to remember:

-Whatever discipline you do, English, or western, when you do get to ride, keep those heels down!

-Make sure you teach a western horse how to neck rein, and bit/mouth rein.

-Change his riding time up a bit. In other words, do transitions a lot, and keep him on his toes, so he doesn't get bored.

-Train him some neat tricks! It sure is fun, and there are tons of books, and tips on-line.

-Don't get frustrated! Trust me, I know from experience that frustration only makes it worse.

-For a few months, board him at a local barn before you move him to your house, and make sure that barn specializes or has that discipline you are riding. Since you don't really know how to ride, take tons of lessons on him!

-Have fun! I know this sounds impossible when mucking stalls and everything, but enjoy it! Remember it keeps your special friend healthy and happy!

-Don't give him tons of treats! It is bad for him, and when horses get cavities, they can't just be filled in by a dentist. They are permanent. A few Froot Loops are fine! My horse loves them!

-Make sure your horse knows that you are the boss. Don't dominate him, or make him afraid of you, but reward him when he did something well, and give a sharp "no." when he did something naughty, and make sure he knows what you're angry for! Never punish him. It will make him a bot headstrong, as I know from experience.

-Enjoy your new pal, get tons of lessons, and best wishes!

~Tangolove

May 14, 2011
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Horse
by: Anonymous

Could you post pics of him in the photo gallery? I am sure he is gorgeous!!!!!!!!!

May 13, 2011
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Thanx
by: Maria

Thank y'all for ur help. I got one who is broke. He is a chincoteague pony with two blue eyes. His name is Sinatra. I am so excited!! YAY

May 12, 2011
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Agree
by: Anonymous

I agree with "Anonymous". It also helps you to work with a broke horse.

May 11, 2011
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ok here's what u should do
by: Anonymous

Okay, I have been around horses my whole life you should totally get one who is broke but hasn't been taught western or English just not to throw you.

Aug 15, 2012
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Get a broke horse
by: Christina

If you haven't ridden much i would suggest that you get a horse that is fully broke and not a yearling. Even if the horse is broke you can still teach him/her new things. Just remember that you want to have fun with your first horse. Good luck:)

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My horse is barn sour... any tips?

I have a 10 year old quarter horse gelding and he is really barn sour. I can't have an enjoyable ride out in the pasture without him getting hyper. I need some tips on how to correct this. Please reply!

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Aug 27, 2012
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walk your horse
by: Rayna

Before you go on any ride, you always need to walk your horse around to get out all those jitters. lunging him for a bit could also work. When you feel he has calmed down a bit, then try to ride him :)

Aug 25, 2012
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Barn Sour Horses
by: SuperSmily

What I think you should do is start training him to like going on a trail ride.

First take him out of the barn and graze him for awhile. The second he starts getting hyper bring him inside do this for a couple more days and add carrots or other treats to teach him that being outside is a great place to be!
Good Luck

Aug 24, 2012
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Thank you!
by: Christina

Thank you, that website really helped me. :)And by "getting hyper" i mean that he does major roll backs trying to go back to the barn and he does this little hoppy rearing thing. Thanks again for all your help!

Aug 22, 2012
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Tips
by: Zipper

well if your horse is barn sour maybe what you need to do is let him out in the pasture on his own, so that he is able to run around and get all the energy out so then you can enjoy a good calm ride. He might not be so hyper once he has a chance to run around a bit in the open. :)

Aug 22, 2012
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Check this out
by: Country Girl

Hey horsecrazygirl! I found this for you. What do you think? http://www.ehow.com/how_2313249_cure-barn-sour-horse.html

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Any tips on how to ask your parents for a horse?

by Sienna
(Nsw, Australia )

Hey my name is Sienna and can I have some tips on how to beg your parents on buying a horse? Thanks!

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Feb 28, 2012
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XD
by: lucinda

there are 15 comments 16 including this one XDXDXD

Dec 31, 2011
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I'm the Same with you Sienna
by: HorseGirl

Hey,
When I read your blog type thing, I thought these comments could help me cause i moved and now i need to get my parents to buy me a new horse cause against my will i had to leave my horses behind.

So I know how you feel.

Dec 27, 2011
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well...
by: Anonymous

do your parents know anything about horses? Are you an certain expert? how would you react if your horse was difficult to ride or to handle? Would you be able to control it? Or your parents? Really think about it, are you ready for a horse? How many times have you ridden? Have you had lessons? CAN YOU CONTROL A HORSE!!!???? How long have you been around horses? Have you only tacked them up once with help (not good) or a million times and can do it with your eyes closed on a difficult horse(brilliant)

Dec 25, 2011
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Tips!!
by: Uma

Well, make your parents feel comfortable with a friend. Perhaps you should ask your riding instructor to help you or find a trustworthy adult who knows a lot about horses. They need an adult they can trust to help you. Plus, show off how much you know about horses. This will keep them comfortable and knowing someone can help them if anything goes wrong. Pick a cute horse!!

Dec 09, 2011
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Tips part 3 and final part!
by: Anneka

Now if you don't know much about horses or how to ride, join a riding school and learn about everything you can and take every opportunity you get until you are ready. Some riding schools tack up the horse for you and you can ask to learn, and maybe tack up and groom and catch and feed the pony you ride. Maybe you can stay after your lesson to help out?
Maybe, you can get a lease if you can't buy a horse. Make sure you have s signed agreement about who pays for what and liability for injuries to horse and rider and what you can do with the horse.
Also, you could buy/lease a horse with your friend. This actually may hurt the friendship you have with your friend more than it helps, so If you do this make sure that you have a signed agreement of who pays for what and who does what and when and where they can go and when and all that stuff!
ALSO Before leasing or buying, check the horse out and ride the horse and watch others ride the horse and do as many different things you can with the horse at every visit. Go a few times!
Best of luck and I hope this helps!

Dec 09, 2011
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Tips part 2
by: Anneka

Then you have to plan. You will have to plan:
*What sort of horse you want, temperament, gender, experience, size, age, what discipline it does.
*How you will keep getting money coming in
*The stuff you will need for your horse
*What you will do in return for your parents since they might be letting you get a horse!
*What he will need to be fed
*Where Your local tack shop, produce store, pony club, vet.
*Where you will keep him that is horse-friendly!
*Finally once you have everything planned, sit down and talk with them. Negotiate and see what you come up with!
Now REMEMBER
Be committed to the horse and your schoolwork.
Keep on top of schoolwork and your grades.
Keep doing those chores.
Be committed to everything you do.
If you ever lose interest in horses, to sell your horse to a loving, kind, knowledgeable home.

Dec 09, 2011
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Tips part 1
by: Anneka

OK.
First of all, you need to know how to look after a horse. Do you? Do you know how to ride? Do you know how to care for them when they are well and ill?
I had to go to a riding school and ask my friends and ride their ponies, and that took me 5 years before I could even get my own horse.
So you need to:
*Know how to care for them, when they are sick or well
*Know how to ride
*Know how to handle them without causing them pain or making them feel uncomfortable
*Be confident
*Have a horse friendly paddock to keep him with at least a hectare. If you get lots of storms and really hot days, you might need a stable and Shelter. You can keep him at your house if you have room, maybe your neighbors if they have room. or your friend's.
*You need all your tack and feed to go with it!

You may know your stuff but what if you don't have money? It usually not the horse that costs allot, it is the ongoing expenses. I pay for my horse, most of it and I do that by finding lost change, and doing an ungodly amount of jobs for pocket money. Do you have time? Or money to pay someone to look after it for you?
If you have the money, or if your parents do, here is what you need to do next:
*I agree with being horse crazy. Throw knowledge and stuff at your parents like the others said!

Dec 06, 2011
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be horse CRAZY!!!
by: Andie

it took me a year, just read alot about them and throw out some knowledge about them. every now and then, but what ever you do.. DON'T GIVE UP!!!

Nov 28, 2011
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I agree
by: Anonymous

i agree with the above comments. Our family has 67 horses, and every week they cost 7000 dollars to keep. Even if you buy just 1 pony, you have to pay for feed, farrier, vet, livery or boarding, water, straw for stable, tack and upkeep of land. It's very expensive, and a pony is not something you can just beg your parents to buy you. When they are ready to take the plunge, you'll know.

Nov 22, 2011
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thanks
by: sienna

Thanks for all of the advice but the main problem is that my parents don't know anything about horses!!!

Nov 11, 2011
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Unicorn--
by: Tiger

Definitely what Unicorn said. She sounds prrreety experienced, and I would go with her advice :)

Good Luck!

Tiger

Nov 06, 2011
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if your parents have the money just don't think your ready read this
by: lucinda

hi sienna um well I have a pony. I spent 5 years begging for a horse before I finally got her, I hope you don't have to wait that long but here's a good excuse well I read in the klutz's book of immaturity that there is a BRILLIANT excuse for getting animals. it said that you should say to your parents :"I have thousands of pets already and they need food water and a warm place to sleep and we are all getting along fine thank you very much" the truth? I just said it it's true you are taking care off thousands of pets they are bugs I can't remember what there name was but they live on your eyebrow and are tiny about for could live happily on this full stop->.<--amazing!! it's true they need food water and a warm place to sleep just like cats and dogs and if your parents say but horses are bigger than cats and dogs just say I mentioned there are thousands of them didn't I? and I think thousands of bugs are the equivalent of a horse? they will be gob smacked so you see? happy horses,
lucinda

Nov 04, 2011
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The ad trader
by: Thoroughbreds4eva

Hi, I had been begging my parents for a horse for ages. I then posted an advert on the ad trader saying '15hh horse wanted for 12year old girl.' About a week later I got a response saying 'I have a 21 year old thoroughbred mare called Tabby. ( An X- Racehorse ) and I am willing to sell her to you for 15 pound a week.' I showed the advert to my parents and the next thing I knew we were on the bus to Chilton. So point being Advertising is the key.

Oct 26, 2011
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Hi Sienna
by: Unicorn

I'm not here to preach, but I do want to point out that your parents often know what's best. Not always - no one's always right - but often. They know how much money they've got and if they can't afford a pony, for the pony's sake they shouldn't get you one.

A horse is a big investment. Not only the initial horse, but it's tack, stabling, feed... the list goes on and on and on. Your parents don't want to spend a whole bunch of money on something you might lose interest in. Of course, if you're truly horse-crazy (and you seem to be), you won't lose interest... but your parents have to be 100% sure. So show them how much you want this - NOT by nagging, begging, having tantrums or shouting at them, but by buckling down and working like a Trojan at your lessons, being a good student (unlikely as this often seems, this IS important), and being willing to make sacrifices. Horses are really really really hard work. You can't just put them back in the cupboard. They need to be fed every day - in the snow, in the rain, in the wind, when you want to go out for dinner, when you want to be visiting friends, when you're not feeling well, the pony always has to be fed. Keeping it at lively changes this a little, but it's still your pony and still your responsibility.

My suggestion? Think twice, be considerate, and be patient. And when you still want a pony... keep dreaming! Never ever ever stop dreaming, Sienna. Nothing can ever stand in the way of a dream, as long as the dreamer keeps dreaming. Nothing! We live in a world where miracles happen. We live in a world where dreams really do come true. Keep believing. And when you get your horse, scream it out on this site so that I can scream and celebrate with you!
Best of luck and happy riding
Unicorn

Oct 22, 2011
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how to ask ur parents for a horse
by: Anonymous

well wait til u get a job, and then u can pay for it and stuff.

Oct 17, 2011
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Good Luck!
by: Rayna

Well, I've tried that millions of times. If you don't have the property, or money, for a horse, you might as well wait until you do.

You see, if you don't have the property and you want to board a horse, but your parents say it is too expensive, it usually is. Boarding a horse costs more than keeping a horse at your place.

However, if you do have the property and money for a horse, but your parents just keep saying no....

Make up a list. Put things on this list that you will do in exchange for a horse. (I.E "I will do dishes for a whole month, I won't ask for money/allowance ever again" things to that nature!)

And then add some good reasons why you should get a horse. I mean GOOD reasons, not just, "because they're cool." Try things like, "Horses are hard to care for, so getting one will teach me how to use my time wisely, and help me learn responsibility!"

When you have finished this list, give it to your parents. If they still say no, do your chores without being asked, be extra kind and loving, and then give it to them once more and see how they react. Good Luck!!

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My Bucking Bronco Ember (Tips please!)

by Meagan
(Central Arkansas)

In Her Calm Moment

In Her Calm Moment

In Her Calm Moment
See? She is a good girl!

This is my horse Ember. She is a 11-12 hand Welsh pony. This spring, her former owner told me that I could have her if I wanted. I was more than thrilled! Who wouldn't want a horse of their own right?

Anyways, what the owner didn't tell me was that she had not been ridden in over 2 months. When I got on her she bucked and kicked. She refuses to listen to what I say at any time! I have ridden her several times now, and she is getting better.

Now, she just trots off and won't stop for anything. Her biggest problem is wanting to graze while under saddle. What happens is that when she goes down to graze, I gently pull up on the reins. The problem though is that she gets very frustrated after 5-6 times of me telling her gently (yet firmly) that grazing is not okay, and she trots off and starts bucking...

I am 16, and I do have experience with horses. However, I am not used to training a horse not to buck or graze while under saddle. All horses I have ridden have been those "dead broke" horses, who may pitch a fit once in awhile.

Ember does fantastic on the ground. I hardly ever tie her up. She just stands there and lets me brush, groom, do hoof care, and groundwork with her! Even during the tacking process she has NO issues whatsoever. She is a model horse, and very sweet! Just not under saddle...

To help with the grazing process, do you think grass (anti-grazing) reins would help? Any tips or comments would be more than helpful.

If you think you could help me, please comment here. Thank you guys so much!

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Jun 02, 2012
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Tips
by: Eventing Star

I've trained horses my whole life... even though I am in middle school...Ok, I use to have a pony who also did this. First though, check for health problems. If there isn't...see if you can ride her in a ring without grass. If you do this she may get out of the habit. If you can't, carry a crop and smack her on the shoulder every time she tries to graze. If she bucks when she wants to graze take her out to the field and walk her around and smack her with the crop when you are on the ground. Also try lunging before you ride to take away energy. She is here to work NOT eat she needs to know this. Keep her feet moving! Do anything... keep her focus on you! Sing to her etc. I have found that dressage works well for this. Also you can get horse muzzles. Work well! Also make sure she isn't out of shape or in heat!!! Also make sure her feed isn't giving her extra energy! Hope I don't sound like a know it all! I am sorry if I do! (: I just want to help!

May 30, 2012
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Medical?
by: Mer

Hmm. Your horse could have medical issues--check her feet, her saddle, her girth area, her legs, etc. If you haven't had a vet to come look at her since you got her, then do so.

If medical issues are not the problem, then the best thing I can tell you to do is observe her. How high does she buck? When does she put her head down? Can you see when she'd going to buck or move? Try to feel her with your body. The best way to do this is to ride bareback, but I don't recommend that unless you've done it before and feel like you can stay relaxed and in control.

I ride a horse just like this, only it's usually a year or so since she's been ridden. She always bucks... And I always ride bareback. One, this helps me feel when she's going to move next. Her body weight shifts and it helps me to pay more attention to her without shifting my own weight around and throwing off my balance. Furthermore, I can more easily grip her sides and it's helped my balance tremendously. Now, I always ride bareback, even on horses I've never ridden before (if the owner allows me to). A word of caution: don't ride bareback unless you feel absolutely comfortable in your riding skills to do so. Also, it's best to try on an older horse first, so you know how it feels.

Now... Have you tried lunging your horse before you ride her? This may take off some of that energy that she has. Perhaps you could get someone else to lead the horse while you ride her--if she has good ground manners, then that may help her while she's under saddle to understand that she shouldn't buck.

Above all, you mustn't let her get away with it! Let her once, and she'll keep on doing it.

Good luck!

Apr 17, 2012
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Be assertive!
by: Rayna

Your horse sounds like my horse, Sophie! Only she wasn't ridden for about 2 or 3 years... Sophie is amazing on the ground and even bareback. Especially with kids. You could jump onto her bareback (and I mean run and jump) and she wouldn't spook or move. Most of it is because she's rather lazy though.

I think getting a nice pair of grass reigns could help, but you need to be a controller of your horse, not a passenger. You need to let Ember know that YOU are boss. I don't mean be rude or anything. Be assertive! Don't let her get away with it!

I'm probably not of any help, considering my Sophie does not buck. She does bite however, and she doesn't budge when under saddle. I am currently in the process of training her. :)

Apr 16, 2012
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Here are a few tips!
by: graciepinata

You are the controller of your horse. If your horse will not listen to you, you need to take control! Do not be shy! Here you have a thousand pound animal and he could do a lot of damage to you. You could also do parelli.

Apr 16, 2012
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Bucking Horses Part 2
by: Georgia

Onto the bucking issue. If Ember isn't sore, either she's not ready for what you're asking her to do (in which case, slow down), she's seriously annoyed with you, she thinks it's fun, or she thinks it'd be a good way to quit working.
Do you know if she bucked with the previous owner? If so, did the owner ride it out or get off? If the owner got off, then Ember thinks she can train humans to get off when they're told.
Does she buck when you ask a particular thing of her, like when you try to turn her? Is she unbalanced to ride? Is she confused? Does she give you any warning?
Can you ride it out when she does buck? Do you get off or stop to gather your wits again when she finishes her hissy fit?

If it's habit to buck when she thinks she wants to take a break, don't let her have that break. Ride it out if you can, and don't let her stop when she finishes bucking - just kick on. Keep her moving. Try circling (it can be harder for a horse to buck when they're going in a circle), and don't let her put her head any lower than her knees if you can help it. Make it as hard for her as possible. A grass rein can be helpful to lessen the force of a buck, but it probably won't help the core problem, whatever it may be. Keeping a tight rein can help, or make things worse, depending on whether she'll just drag you down with her, or if she feels stressed with a tight rein.

Finally, if you can't fix it, then your only option may be a professional trainer. Flying lessons courtesy of a horse are not fun, and you definitely don't want to break anything.


I hope this helps, and that you can figure out a solution soon!


Georgia

Apr 16, 2012
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Bucking Horses Part 1
by: Georgia

It sounds to me like Ember definitely doesn't want you in the saddle for some reason. Does the saddle fit properly? Have you had her vet-checked? If she's fine on the ground but not under saddle, she may be sore.

If she's not sore, then it instantly becomes more difficult to find the problem, especially since none of us are there to see for ourselves. So, rather than give you "do this, do that" answers, I'm going to give you some questions to think about and a few suggestions, because the same thing doesn't work for every horse, and you need to find something that works yourself. As people who are from the next state over to the other side of the world, we're not really qualified to decide what needs to be done - we don't know your mare well enough. I'll still probably miss a few possible issues - hopefully other people commenting might pick those up.

Some horses are okay after two months of no riding, others need a bit of encouragement. Do you know why the former owner stopped riding her? Was it because of the problems you're facing now? When Ember goes for a "wander" is she just ignoring you to go wherever she wants? Is she heading somewhere she can graze more easily? Or is she just trotting for the sake of it? If she's not listening to you, make her listen - if you can, try dragging her head around to the side and making her circle. Her body should follow her head unless she's got some pretty fancy footwork up her saddle pad.
When she tries to graze, does she just throw her head down in a way that either drags the reins through your hands or yanks you out of the saddle? Or does she just stubbornly stretch her head down? Can you see her eyeing up a yummy patch of grass? We give tourists (generally beginner riders) tips on how to get a horse's head up (the trick is to pull one rein, not both), but not as much on how to stop then grazing in the first place. Watch her head carefully, and you might see small signs when she's spotted some grass she wants to eat (slight head turn, head drop, ears, etc) though she probably won't give you much to look for. If you see her thinking about it, try to tell her that it's not happening before she tries it out.

If she gives you no warning or it's getting to the point where she just about pulls you out of the saddle, then yes, a grass rein could help. Be careful not to have it too tight, but just enough that she can't get her head down too far. This could also help reduce the force when she's bucking, especially if she generally goes completely wild.

Apr 16, 2012
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Longing
by: Anonymous

Have you ever tried longing her before riding to get out all of her extra energy? That's what I would do. Also I think there are reins you can buy for horses who like to stop and snack! Lol I think they might be called grass reins. You attach them To the d-ring on you saddle on the side and attach the other end to the bit. I have never tried those because I have never had this issue but good luck!(:

May 11, 2012
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HI
by: ABBIGABBI

HI, I'VE TRAINED HORSES, AND THIS USUALLY WORKS. WHEN SHE BUCKS YOU OFF STAY ON THE GROUND, BUT KEEP HER MOVING. HUSTLE HER. DON'T LET ANY OF HER FEET REST. HUSTLE!!! IF SHE IS REALLY MEAN, AN 1/2 OF A HOUR. MILD, 13-15 MINUTES. WISH YOU LUCK!!

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Building trust... again! (Tips and advice appreciated)

by Lucinda
(NZ)

me and bella before the holliday

me and bella before the holliday

me and bella before the holliday
after, well she didn't buck but but still

Well I went on holiday for a week, my eldest sibling Danni stayed at home to look after my pony Bella.

Unfortunately when I got home Bella didn't recognize me and she thinks she's the boss but worst of all, I have to build up our trust again! She only just started to trust me as I got her in July.

I have to get our bond up again any tips would be appreciated. Bella now threatens to bite me when I'm picking out her hooves, mounting her etc. Danni asked little of her so she thought she was retiring or something (she was 21 on 23/1/12) but now I have to get her used to my weight :\ so I cant ride her for a while :|

Help! Tips for bonding would be good and tips for letting me ride her. Thanks! :)

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Mar 08, 2012
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.
by: Anonymous

use the joining up technique and do ground work :)

Mar 08, 2012
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No Way!
by: PogoLvr

Your horse can't possibly think she's retiring after a week of vacation. I LOVE the Join-Up idea, but it sounds to me like you need to show her who's boss. (No, not the mean way.) My favorite way of dealing with biters is to groom her in a field, not tied up. The second she tries to bite, tell her to back up, and after awhile she should associate biting with work, since back-up isn't natural in a horse. If your horse is sensitive, it's also a good idea to take her for long walks around the pasture/farm. The second she doesn't do what you want, start waving the rope around her face. It annoys them, and soon they associate Being Bad= Annoyance/Work. Hope this helps! :)

Feb 20, 2012
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HEY ABBY + MILLIE
by: Kailee

i do not agree with you i agree on the joining up BUT DON'T LUNG! you only play the circling game LUNGING makes the horse do it but circling game ASKS! plus DON'T HIT THE HORSE WHEN IT NIPS AT YOU! (or tap whatever you said) it causes problems cause then the horse will try to figure out how to get in and out before you hit the horse. you simply DO JUMPING JACKS RAISE YOU ARMS stuff like normal then the horse will think the reason he got hit was HIS/HER FAULT NOT YOURS!! plus there is a lot a lot more stuff you have to do to earn HIS/HER trust not just JOINING UP! TRUST ME I KNOW (if you want more details VISIT http://www.parellinaturalhorsetraining.com/

THAT IS MY HORSE TRAINING SITE!

Feb 19, 2012
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Building Trust the Natrual Way
by: Abby+Millie

I'm not trying to sound like a horse psychic, but the best way to build trust is to use the Monty Roberts Join Up Method.
Start out in a round pen.
Flick a rope at your horse's hindquarters - you are chasing her off and refuse to let her in your herd. Without a herd, she's vulnerable.
Make her circle the ring at a canter until you see the signs she's ready to join your herd - head lowering, mouth making chewing motions, ear flicking toward you. Then drop your defensive posture (rope flicking, eye staring) and look at the ground, turn away and dip your shoulders. She will come to you. When she follows you, the join up is complete.
Other than join up, ways to gain her trust are: spending time with her - grooming. Treats, but not so many she gets pushy.
Most of all, horses respect firmness. I'm not saying don't baby her, just do it in an alpha-horse way. The learder earns respect and trust. The leader is someone who can make the horse's feet move.
When Bella tries to nip you, gently give her muzzle a jab with your finger and remind her to stay out of your space. Remain in your leader position that you are in charge, and even lunge her when she bites.

Hope you have luck with Bella! I'm not an expert, so I hope this helps!

Thanks and God Bless,

Abby+Millie <3

Feb 07, 2012
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hey
by: Anonymous

YOUR WELCOME ! :)

Feb 07, 2012
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thanks
by: lucinda

thanks for the tips I will definitely use them.

Feb 03, 2012
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Pebbles
by: lilylovespebbles

Bella sounds alot like my pony pebbles. in lessons pebbles pigroots tries to rear and almost bolts. but on the ground it is a diffent story - she loves me like crazy. she will follow me and nuzzle me and great for tacking up. she used to run away from me and bite me and be super girthy but over time i did everything for her, i groomed her and found all her nice spots and paid special attention to those. I rode her bareback tacked her up and took her on new trails (doing new things with her will improve your bond) EVERY LITTLE THING HELPS IF YOU KEEP AT IT!!

Feb 01, 2012
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Advice
by: Flying with Horses

I recommend building the relationship up from the ground, so no riding until she trusts and respects you again. Work with her on the ground, at liberty and in a roundpen, so that she is free to move and express herself. Learn all that you can about horse whispering, not the Monty Roberts style which I DO NOT recommend at all, but a more gentle, playful way of asking her to move away from you, and releasing all pressure as soon as she does. This is how horses communicate with each other. It's important to be clear about what you're asking, and to not let her push into your space, as this is a challenge. Here's me with my horses at liberty, it took a while to get this light and flowing :) ENJOY the journey xx

Jan 31, 2012
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hey
by: Anonymous

That sounds like my horse, she's threatening to bite me all the time. i am trying to use this method Called Parelli, it is really good. it has worked somewhat on my horse. i got to ride it once just walking though not far but then i jumped off and i was going to get back on but i can't because she threatens to bite here is a website link http://www.parellinaturalhorsetraining.com/ just browse i am doing the level one dvds (or lessons)
hope this helped you out :)

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I need tips for getting a horse!!!???!!!???

by Celina
(AB, CA)

I used to have 2 horses but then I moved and had to leave them behind at the stables I rode at. Now its like my parents forgot that I used to have to leased horses.

I took lessons every week, I went to theory lessons once and occasionally twice a week, I've been around them since I was a little kid. I read info about everything about them but i still can't get 1.

I think it just needs time, and maybe we should talk about it, and find a place to keep the horse if I were to get one.

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Jan 30, 2012
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hey
by: Celina

Hey yeah sienna. I think patience is what i need and my parents need to trust that i still know all my stuff, which means more waiting and patience.

Jan 30, 2012
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Same
by: Sienna

And tust me. I'm the exact same. I still don't have a horse!! But only time will tell.

Jan 11, 2012
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it's ok
by: sienna

Maybe a little more patience is all you need and show your parents how horse crazy you are and how much you miss them. If this doesn't work let me know!!

Jan 04, 2012
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hi
by: HorseGirl

Um, forget the last part of the blog thing cause i meant to erase that but i need help with tips. Please

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Any advice on cantering?

by Sienna
(Nowra Hill, NSW, Australia)

Hey I've just learned how to canter but my feet keep going right into the stirrups!! Can you please help me??

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Aug 15, 2012
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thank you but....
by: Sienna

Thank you so much but i forgot to tell everyone that I am a beginner. I don't even have my own horse. I go riding at a friends house and I don't have a trainer either!! my parents won't even send me to a riding school!!! They won't let me have a horse because it is way too expensive. But the horse I ride is a really well behaved horse and I think I pull on the reins too hard when we start to canter.

Aug 11, 2012
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Dont worry about it!:)
by: Horseluver4evernever

Hey Sienna! I know your problem! We have all gone through it. Do you ride English or western? I ride English so I can tell you some tricks. Remember that When you canter the stirrup should be on the ball of your foot. Lift your seat out of the saddle and just brush it gently as if your bumm is a broom and your sweeping the saddle. Let your horse move you. As you rise out of your saddle push the weight in to your heels. It will allow your heels to go down and keep your leg in the proper position. Don't be scared to Talk to your trainer about it. Ask her/him to help you with it. Don't worry you'll get it!:) good luck

Jun 06, 2012
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I learnt from somebody else
by: lilylovespebbles

tegan taught me so i sort of automatically assume it, it is the right thing to do but it might not be ......

Jun 05, 2012
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ok?
by: Sienna

Hey Lily, lots of people r saying not 2 lean back. I'm not against you or anything but why do you tell me to lean back?

Jun 02, 2012
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Hey!
by: Eventing Star

Ok, you are wearing boots right??? If you aren't get some! Wearing anything but boots is really dangerous since your feet can slip through and if you fall off the horse can drag you. Same as the others! Heels down! FAR! If you need to stand in the saddle to get them down and make them stay there! Squeeze with your legs but, NOT with your knees. Also see if you can do a lesson on the lunge line so you don't have to worry about steering or anything! Only your position! oh, DON'T LEAN BACK!!! This can get you into a VERY hard habit to break! You wont get a blue ribbon if you are leaning back!!! Hopes this helps!!!!

May 31, 2012
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Sienna-
by: Elle

When you replied to my last comment you said Lily reckons it's best to put your heels down. Then you asked putting your heels dOwn or pointing your toes up is better, everyone has a different opinion and really its up to you to decide which way helps you stay balanced the most. Also, leaning back is a BAD Habit! If you lean back now, it will be hard the have the right position later. I know its hard to balance and remember everything when your learning but just keep it in mind! ;)

Also, a few ways that i learned to ride was being lunged without reins but with a saddle. Completely remove the stirrup irons. Get someone who is experienced at lunging and knows the horse well to lunge you. Walk and trot around on the lunge with your arms out. This will help you improve your balance and it is actually really fun! When you can do this really well do it in a canter. 💘 When you can do the above exercise, then try cantering Off the lunge. Also maybe try doing different exercises at the trot such as : 20m circle, diagonals and serpentine- to help get use to staying balanced whilst turning then you will feel mire confident to canter because you know that you can control chester at a trot in many different patterns.

Hope this helps! Have fun cantering! :)

May 08, 2012
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hullo
by: sienna

thanx Lily I forgot to tell everyone that I was only a beginner.

May 04, 2012
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To TheRider
by: lilylovespebbles

sienna comes riding at our house and she is a real beginner at cantering and after a few more goes we will tell her to sit up straighter but the horse that she rides, chester or as we like to call him Mr C, has the bumpiest an rockiest canter ever!! But we want her just to lean back for now.... she doesn't pull on his mouth or squeeze with her legs when she is leaning back and Mr C is a very push-button horse and knows were he is going!! and she does still look where she is going. Sorry for any confusion!!!

May 01, 2012
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Defanitly sticking with Anonymous!
by: TheRider

Keep the stirrups on the balls of your feet! Toes in, heels down, look up, sit straight!

Do not lean back in the saddle, that is only when you've never loped and you have an instructor in a round pen on the lunge line!

lilylovespebbles has a good point! You want your hips to move with the horses motion! "Let your hips roll"!

Mar 20, 2012
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thank you!!
by: sienna

ohh thank you Sara!!! not only you gave me good advice but you backed up my friend!!! Thanks

Mar 15, 2012
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cantering
by: Sara

I think i know your problem. I think your problem is that you grip the saddle with your knees. You should keep an even pressure from your waist down to your heels. also keep your heels down, that's what my instructor told me to do. I really hope this helps!

Mar 13, 2012
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is it really?
by: sienna

Lily says it's better if you put your heals down. People what do you think? is it easier to point your toes up or push your heal down?

Mar 08, 2012
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cantering.
by: Elle

Hey Sienna!!!!! When you are cantering try not to grip with your knees, have even pressure from ur seat down to your heel. Put your heels down and sit up tall, gluing your bottom into the seat. if putting your heels down doesn't help, point your toes up ;)

Mar 03, 2012
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Uh-ha!!!!
by: sienna

See i told you!!! (I'm talking to the person you sent 'Balls on your feet')

Feb 21, 2012
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IT IS!!!!
by: lilylovespebbles

leaning back is the best thing to do if you are just beginning because it helps you swivel your hips with the horse. Until you get more confident cantering just lean back. Still go on the balls of your feet so that your feet don't slip through the stirrups.

Feb 19, 2012
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Uh-oh
by: sienna

Who did the 'Balls on your feet comment?' Because I've got a friend that tells me it's the best thing to lean back.

Feb 14, 2012
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heels down!
by: Anonymous

Keep your heels down (: and practice makes perfect! I've been riding since I was two and even I sometimes mess up!

Feb 14, 2012
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Balls of your feet!
by: Anonymous

No - you certainly DO NOT want to lean back!! Leaning back is a bad result of showing your losing your balance, and your out of control. Leaning back is ONLY used when your coming back to a trot, you want to slightly push your weight backwards and squeeze the reins when you want to go back to trot.
All you have to do is push your heels down, keep a relaxed seat, and SIT to the saddle. You can always slowly learn by holding onto the saddle, but you cant hold tight on your reins whilst doing this learning method as when your holding you will pull on the horses bit, and not only will it make it uncomfortable for him but he will think your giving him the signal of stop!
Just keep your heels down and look up. Maintain a glued down seat, and if you feel your feet slipping into the stirrups badly, come back to trot, sort them and KEEP them on the balls of your feet.
Practice makes perfect! My pony has a very fast extended canter, making me struggle in my SJ classes, and I have to push my weight on the balls of my feet to make sure I keep a steady glued to the saddle canter and so my feet dont slip into the stirrup!
The last thing you want to do is get the stirrup right down onto the heel; just come back to trot, sort your stirrups and keep them on the balls. of. your. feet.
I hoped this help, good look :D! x

Feb 03, 2012
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Pebbles
by: Anonymous

Keep your heels right down (like down) and turn them out so that you aren't asking him to go faster which could make him bumpier. AND LEARN BACK!!!! And make another horse (read the title!!:-)) lead so that you can concentrate on your problem other than directing him.

Jan 31, 2012
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Cantering.
by: Moosie

Don't worry, everyone goes through that stage. What you really want to do it press your heels all the way down and keep your foot behind the girth. And then... SQUEEZE WITH YOUR LEGS. It's a lot to think about when cantering, I know, but once you really practice it, you can actually do it without thinking about it.
One other way (if you really really believe you can) try it without stirrups while keeping your legs still, then do it with stirrups. But since you just started, I would recommend keeping the stirrups...

HAVE FUN! ~~Moose

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Tips, Please?

by Sophie
(Mesa, AZ, U.S.)

Okay, so I've wanted a horse for 3 years now, but I still don't have one. I've been begging my parents for one, BUT I CAN'T WIN THEM OVER FOR A HORSE!!! Does anybody have any tips? If you do, I will use all of them for sure! Thanks!!!!!

Comments for Tips, Please?

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Mar 17, 2012
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YES!!!
by: Sophie

Y'all, girls who posted tips, I just wanted to thank you because your tips really worked! My mom said YES! But in a few years, when we move to a ranch. :(. But, hey, it worked. I narrowed down to 3 breeds: Mustang, Quarter Horse, and Morgan... what do you think is best? Please comment on the breeds! Thanks!

Mar 03, 2012
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Time
by: Cara

I've been waiting for my horse for 5 years now, but money's tight, and my family cannot afford to board a horse, our backyard is way to small! I know I'll have to wait a long time to have a horse, but I can still have a lot of fun at my lessons. I volunteer, to work on the stables, and I usually get to ride a horse or two. What my family is looking at, is possibly leasing a horse from the stable. If your in the same situation maybe this is an option for you? Hope this helps!

Jan 13, 2012
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other comments
by: lucinda

listen to the other comments they are very wise and I had to whine for 5 years before I got a pony but I knew enough about them to get her seriously I think you should take riding lessons where you tack your horse up your self etc.
Maybe you should go on a trial of a horse, my riding instructor Laurie let me do that for my pony Bella and I went for a lesson everyday for a week in those lessons i went at ten and caught my pony with my mum and Laurie then took of her cover and groomed her then tacked her up and rode and in the last 3 days she didn't instruct me, my mum was there so she instructed me instead because Laurie said that would be what would be happening at home.
You should do something Like that even on just a random pony that your not even getting and sometimes it's nice to do a trial with a friend occasionally riding with you.

I hope this helps and I hope you get a great pony just like I did <3 bye

Jan 07, 2012
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Horse tips
by: Leah F.

I definitely agree with the other comments, you DEFINITELY have to already know your stuff (and it will impress your parents!). Because if your parents give in and get you a horse, and you have trouble with a lot of things, the horse will most likely go back.

I do recommend taking riding lessons, try and find lessons that will fit what you want to learn about horses (do they just throw a kid on a horse, or do they go through the grooming, tacking up, etc. processes?) Do you want to learn Western or English? If you can start taking lessons, it will calm your "I want a horse!!" nerves (it did with me!) ;)sometimes, your trainer will have a horse or 2 for sale, that you can buy from them, and possibly keep on their land (be prepared to do chores to help with the keep of your horse!).

But there's also a disappointing side, the economy is bad, and a lot of people don't have the extra money just to buy a horse. If you guy's don't, try to look for a horse you can lease, and to help offset the cost (yes, you got it) help out with horse chores! But horse chores are great. :) Try and get your parents to watch you ride, and let them watch your progress. It's different from a ground-view. If you keep up some great work and responsibility, they'll probably (maybe eventually) say yes.

Good luck!

Jan 05, 2012
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Other Pages
by: Anneka

There have been several pages recently about tips for getting a horse. Be sure to check out those :)
But here are a few ones:

Do you know how to ride? If not, learn.
DO you know how to care for them, from grooming to health issues to mucking out stalls? If not, learn.
Do you know how to keep a pasture healthy? If not, learn.
Do you have the land? If not, do you have the money to board him somewhere? If not, get land or maybe lease or take lessons.
Do you know how to keep tack in good condition? If not, learn.
Do you have the time? If not, make time or consider a lease.
Do you know what is involved? If not, allot is.

The horse isn't usually the main...money loser. It is the gear costs, vet and farrier bills and ongoing costs. You will have to get up early to care for it and check on it every afternoon.
Do you have the money? If not, get it and maintain an ongoing income, or forget it, or consider a lease.

If you are perfectly capable of taking care of a horse etc. talk to your parents and ask them why they don't want you to get a horse. Show them you are responsible enough to get one and show them, you are more than ready to take it on.

Do lots of chores, work out a budget, talk about keeping costs down without harming the horse. You may have to sacrifice another leisure activity for it.

And one very important thing: If you ever lose interest in horses, swear that you will send your horse on to a loving, experienced, caring home.

Hope this helps

Jan 04, 2012
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Hope This Helps!
by: Anonymous

I begged for like 2 and a half years then I finally broke my dad down and he gave in. But we got a free horse so that might be it too. I left notes in his bed, every time he called I would ask and every time I saw him I asked so maybe try that.

But if you do get a free horse or any horse make sure it is sound because my horse got lame for months after I started riding him but he was a pasture horse for years and had arthritis (didn't know that till after I got him).

But if you do get a horse don't get caught up in the moment like I did with my horse sometimes I think I shouldn't have gotten him because he is sometimes has too much pep for me. As soon as I got on him I knew he was the horse and didn't need to see any others but see at least 2 too make sure unlike I did!

Good luck please comment back to let me know how it goes!

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