My horse won't slow down!

by Nicole
(Ohio)

The horse I ride is about twelve years old, and she refuses to keep her trot slow. She speeds up, and ignores my signals to slow down. What do I do?

She is rubbernecked too, and every time I turn her head to the inside, she speeds up. How can I fix this?

Also, how do I keep her at the same pace?

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Dec 30, 2015
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Hey there
by: Anonymous

Hey there I own a three year old colt appendix and he's quite leggy but we had the same problem but what I would do since your horse is 12 I'm guessing she or he is in a shank bit well go back to the basics and put her in a snaffle ring or course and use two hands. Also when u ride put your hands by your knees so you have more of a direct pressure and also make sure you are in a round pen or at least doing 20 meter circles or about half the arena also don't worry about her neck being flimsy I congratulate u for flexing her enough that she is that. Also if you know what ground driving is do lots and lots of that this will help your horse a lot
Trying to be helpful
Audrey

Jan 10, 2015
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NO
by: Alyssa the horse gentler

DO NOT DO ANY THING THAT WILL HURT HIM OR HER!! I do not know but just do what I put at the top!!

Jun 16, 2014
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Maybe this will help
by: Anonymous

My trainer helped me with the same problem with a horse i lease.. take your reins into two hand and "bump" her meaning move your wrists left right one hand than the other causing your horse two try to slow. It causes your horse to put it head down slowing it down.. It also might help if you lightly kick at the same time. If you have any questions just ask :) hope this helps!

Dec 17, 2013
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Slowing down
by: Anonymous

Try lunging her! Use voice commands. :)

Or half-halting. (pull back on the reins, release and repeat.) So its literally going:

Pull
Let go
Pull
Let go.. etc

Nov 12, 2013
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Position
by: Anonymous

I recently had a problem like that. It is curable by you, don't worry! You said she ignores your signals. Here's an exercise, when you go to ride start out at the walk and do circles, figure eights, changes of direction constantly. This will keep her focused on what is happening next. Try it at other gaits too.

Second, make sure your position is solid. Your heels are down you are looking up and you are trying! When I rode a pony for my instructor I had to make sure my whole mind was in stopping the pony.
MAKE him stop. Don't let her get the best of you! Show who is boss!
Good luck...
Manowar

Jul 01, 2013
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Whoa
by: Sadee

Whoa her get one rein and twist it all the way to the side tell her nose is next to your boot. Then once she stops twisting let her have her face and try again.

Jun 27, 2013
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Bending and Transition work
by: Bethany

Try your bending more thoroughly. Yes, your turning her to the inside, but when bending you must keep contact with your outside aids too.
At the moment, your using your inside aids. That's your inside leg and inside rein to bend/turn to the inside. But you've got to keep in contact with those outsides!
The outside rein must be at same length with your inside. If it doesn't feel short enough, don't be afraid to shorten it! Whilst asking for the bend with the inside aids, squeeze and keep contact with your outside rein, and block her from running off with your outside leg.
Easier way to think:
OUTSIDE = slow me down!
INSIDE = bend woman, bend!

Once you've got this covered, neaten your transitions up. Hope this helped. This will also help her work from behind - bonus!

Jun 25, 2013
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Bandi
by: Nicole

She moves that way all the time.

Jun 03, 2013
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rubber neck horse
by: Bandi

ya. I feel for anybody who has had to deal with a rubber neck horse. I had a horse someone gave to me that way and I found the reins are almost unless. But I also found natural horsemanship to be the great answer for the overwhelming problem. what I learned was he responded at the head and neck but I had no control over his feet. His head seem to be listening but his body wasn't. Natural horsemanship will give you answers for it you just wouldn't believe.

Jun 01, 2013
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nicole
by: Bandi

Does she run that speed in any direction or does she run that speed just where she wants to go?

May 30, 2013
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3 things
by: Katie

This reminds me a lot of how my horse used to be, and now, I can trot and canter on a loose rein without speeding up! I believe in natural horsemanship, and i am living proof that this stuff works. A few things that you can do are:

1: if she starts pulling you around, speeding up her pace, then pull back firmly, not hard, on the reins until she stops and make her back up for quite a ways before you go forward again. This is telling her that those reins mean something.

2: Do what is called a one-rein stop. You pull her sharply to the inside, whiled using your inside leg to knock her hindquarters out. Basically kick her with your inside leg until her back feet step over each other.

3: Eventually after you have taught her what the reins mean, you need to go around the arena on a loose rein. It might be scary but it helps her to find and steady her own pace without you getting in her way. If she speeds up, fix it but then get out.

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